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Here Are 10 Brands To Watch at the Second Edition of PROJECT Digital

Here Are 10 Brands To Watch at the Second Edition of PROJECT Digital

While things still aren’t exactly business as usual, PROJECT Digital must go on — and the premier trade event for contemporary menswear is back for its second online appearance. The sophomore virtual edition kicked off January 19 and runs through February 22, allowing unprecedented access to a diverse group of brands, thoughtful and intelligent programming featuring industry insiders breaking down the current state of affairs in fashion, and more — all without having to step foot outside.

As one of the largest fashion tradeshows in the world, PROJECT is home to a wide range of up-and-coming brands and retailers, featuring everything from streetwear to athleisure, to classic sportswear and tailoring — all in one digital marketplace. We highlighted 10 brands that are worth watching in 2021.

Bobblehaus prides itself on being a genderless, eco-conscious label. All of its fabrics are sourced from deadstock materials and prominently features certified recycled cotton mixes and TENCEL lyocell fibers — a material made from sustainably sourced wood and used in 80% of the brand’s collection.

The iconic Italian denim label receives a modern refresh thanks to new Creative Director Glenn Martens, who took the reins as head designer last October. Martens’ debut collection shifts the rules of men’s fashion and updates to key items and new assortments will surely bring new fans aboard the Diesel train.

The Italian tailoring house first introduced KNT by Kiton in 2018 as a way to infuse the benefits of athleisure — mainly its comfort and wearability — with the polished look of tailored clothing. Standing for “Kiton New Textures,” the diffusion line has come a long way since then and has developed new fabrics and its own aesthetic along the way, like this chic velvet pinstripe suit pictured here.

Willy Chavarria’s avante-garde approach to streetwear coupled with his socially-minded views has earned the designer a special place in fashion. The conceptual label is Chavarria’s way to use fashion as both a political and creative outlet — the clothes are meant to be empowering and expressive in their approach to silhouette and fabrication.

As one of the OGs of the ‘90s streetwear scene, Nautica has been slowly bringing back the classics. For its Spring collection, the American lifestyle brand is pulling more styles from its archives, including pieces featuring the classic Nautica graphic logo.

This Black-owned label is the first sustainable denim brand made in Harlem, New York. Its genderless designs pay homage to the untold history of indigenous peoples and African slaves that helped shape the American denim and manufacturing industries.

This New York-based label brings a socio-political worldview into each season’s collection while infusing it with the rebellious nature and free spirit of the city it hails from. Each season’s theme touches on a social or political issue and is then presented through the format of a traditional print newspaper.

After Korean designer Jungwoo Park got part of his graduate design project stolen in 2017 in a strange series of events, news spread quickly of the theft and social media sparked a city-wide search. After it was discovered on a homeless person in London, Jungwoo Park was never actually able to retrieve it, and decided to launch The Stolen Garment instead to commemorate that fateful day.

For over 80 years, Hestra has been devoted to crafting the finest gloves in the world. Today, the family-owned Swedish brand employs two of the world’s fewer than 100 master certified glove cutters so you’ll know that anything bearing its name is built to last.

Founded in 2018, Victor Li started his label as a strictly menswear outfit, but gradually transitioned the brand into unisex designs featuring menswear-inspired silhouettes. Li’s collections incorporate cross-cultural ideas he’s gleaned from his travels — each season is a reflection of those adventures and memories and what draws us to different places around the world.

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